It’s Hurricane Season

Hurricane season is upon us, now through the end of November. Stay smart and stay safe by preparing yourself and your family for a potential disaster.

Below are some of the top hurricane preparedness tips to help you weather a storm:

  1. Create an evacuation plan
  2. Build an emergency kit:

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

  • Water (one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation)
  • Food (at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food)
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask (to help filter contaminated air), plastic sheeting and duct tape
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

 

3. Ensure access to radio broadcasts for information and updates

 

4. Protect windows with storm shutters or plywood (and store all unsecured outdoor items from blowing away)

 

5. Be informed and ready (Learn your community’s hurricane response plan. Plan evacuation routes or locations of nearby shelters. Register family members with special needs or requirements and make a plan for your pets.)

 

6. The Red Cross Emergency App can help provide guidance on what to do before, during and after hurricanes (redcross.org/apps).

 

 

 

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Are you prepared for a hurricane?

Below are some safety steps found to help you and your family prepare for dangerous hurricane weather:

Hurricane

 

 

 

 

 

 

“To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Know your surroundings.
  • Learn the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you know how your property will be affected when storm surge or tidal flooding are forecasted.
  • Identify levees and dams in your area and determine whether they pose a hazard to you.
  • Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine where you would go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.
  • Make plans to secure your property:
  • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Reinforce your garage doors; if wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.
  • Install a generator for emergencies.
  • If in a high-rise building, be prepared to take shelter on or below the 10th floor.
  • Consider building a safe room.”

For more information on preparing for hurricanes, visit http://www.ready.gov/hurricanes

Prepare yourself for hurricane season

Environmental Tip of the Month:

June first marks the beginning of hurricane season in the U.S. and runs through November. Before a hurricane strikes, visit some of these helpful links to prepare yourself, your home and your community.

http://www.epa.gov/naturaldisasters/hurricanes/

http://www.ready.gov/hurricanes/

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/prepare/wwa.php

Environmental Tip of the Month

Did you know that September is National Preparedness Month? It’s also the peak of hurricane activity.

The best thing you can do is prepare yourself for emergencies. Visit the link below to learn how you can reduce risks from environmental hazards if a natural disaster should strike.

http://www.epa.gov/naturalevents/hurricanes/